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2019 FHA Loan Limits in Nevada

Nevada’s housing prices range widely depending on the county, and so do the FHA loan limits. In most areas of Nevada, a single-family home has a loan limit of $314,827. In Reno, however, a buyer can get a single-family FHA home loan for as much as $412,850; and in Douglas County, the limit is the highest in the state, at $423,200 for a single-family home.

If you’re a Nevada resident looking to buy a home using an FHA loan, you’ll have lots of company. A 2016 FHA report (the last year in which this data was made available) noted that 37.7% of mortgages originating in Nevada were FHA loans. That made Nevada the second most popular spot for FHA loans, behind Puerto Rico. A 2018 report showed that 1.39% of all FHA loans nationwide were made in Nevada.

Nevada is also growing fast. A December 2018 Census report found that Nevada and Idaho shared the title of fastest-growing state, with both populations increasing by approximately 2.1% between July 2017 and July 2018. The current population is estimated at just more than 3 million.

Nevada FHA loan limits by county

FHA Loan Limits in Nevada
County Single-Family Limit Two-Family Limit Three-Family Limit Four-Family Limit Median Sale Price
Carson City $318,550 $407,800 $492,950 $612,600 $277,000
Churchill $314,827 $403,125 $487,250 $605,525 $189,000
Clark $322,000 $412,200 $498,250 $619,250 $280,000
Douglas $423,200 $541,750 $654,850 $813,850 $368,000
Elko $314,827 $403,125 $487,250 $605,525 $198,000
Esmeralda $314,827 $403,125 $487,250 $605,525 $122,000
Eureka $314,827 $403,125 $487,250 $605,525 $198,000
Humboldt $314,827 $403,125 $487,250 $605,525 $159,000
Lander $314,827 $403,125 $487,250 $605,525 $130,000
Lincoln $314,827 $403,125 $487,250 $605,525 $82,000
Lyon $314,827 $403,125 $487,250 $605,525 $235,000
Mineral $314,827 $403,125 $487,250 $605,525 $71,000
Nye $314,827 $403,125 $487,250 $605,525 $150,000
Pershing $314,827 $403,125 $487,250 $605,525 $96,000
Storey $412,850 $528,500 $638,850 $793,950 $359,000
Washoe $412,850 $528,500 $638,850 $793,950 $359,000
White Pine $314,827 $403,125 $487,250 $605,525 $70,000

How are FHA loan limits determined?

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) sets FHA loan limits based on the conforming loan limit — or how large of a mortgage government-sponsored entities Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac will purchase. In 2019, that limit has been set at $484,350.

Loan limits are set by county, and take into account real estate costs in those areas. The FHA “floor” is the largest mortgage the agency will insure in most of the country and is set at $314,827 for 2019. The FHA “ceiling” applies to high-cost areas and is set at 150% of the conforming loan limit, or $726,525 this year. Outside of a few exceptions, this is the highest mortgage the agency will insure for a single-family home. In many counties, loan limits fall somewhere between the FHA floor and ceiling.

Here are the 2019 standard FHA limits for the different property types, also known as the floor:

  • One-unit: $314,827
  • Two-unit: $403,125
  • Three-unit: $487,250
  • Four-unit: $605,525

Here are the 2019 standard FHA ceiling limits, for high-cost areas:

  • One-unit: $726,525
  • Two-unit: $930,300
  • Three-unit: $1,124,475
  • Four-unit: $1,397,400

Do you qualify for an FHA loan in Nevada?

An FHA loan may be able to help you with your homebuying needs, but you must qualify. Your credit score, income level and debt-to-income ratio will all be taken into consideration by lenders. To learn more about qualifying for an FHA loan and other information about the process, visit LendingTree’s main FHA page.

 

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