How to Compare Car Insurance Quotes 2024
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Car Insurances Rates by State for 2024

Updated on:
Content was accurate at the time of publication.

The state you live in is a big factor when determining how much you pay for car insurance. This is because states often have different car insurance requirements and different risks for drivers. Knowing the average cost of car insurance in your state can help you determine if you’re overpaying for car insurance.

Find the Cheapest Car Insurance Quotes in Your Area

The average cost of a full-coverage car insurance policy nationally is $1,984 a year, while the average cost for a minimum-coverage policy is $777.

Average car insurance rates by state

StateFull coverageMinimum coverage
Alabama$1,979$717
Alaska$1,635$663
Arizona$2,683$1,079
Arkansas$1,879$622
California$1,867$571
Colorado$2,542$897
Connecticut$2,346$1,088
Delaware$2,482$1,283
Florida$2,990$1,206
Georgia$1,832$790
Hawaii$1,643$609
Idaho$1,227$413
Illinois$2,109$848
Indiana$1,511$533
Iowa$1,663$444
Kansas$1,991$616
Kentucky$2,295$1,183
Louisiana$2,719$948
Maine$1,100$501
Maryland$2,051$1,093
Massachusetts$2,068$757
Michigan$4,638$1,849
Minnesota$1,884$743
Mississippi$1,796$662
Missouri$1,908$686
Montana$2,174$574
Nebraska$1,909$470
Nevada$2,958$1,368
New Hampshire$1,146$537
New Jersey$2,236$1,393
New Mexico$1,953$632
New York$2,030$1,059
North Carolina$1,305$532
North Dakota$1,858$522
Ohio$1,329$532
Oklahoma$2,119$656
Oregon$2,115$1,092
Pennsylvania$1,861$603
Rhode Island$2,636$1,213
South Carolina$1,808$803
South Dakota$2,016$351
Tennessee$1,554$505
Texas$1,833$696
Utah$2,261$989
Vermont$1,232$417
Virginia$2,110$923
Washington$1,534$651
Washington, D.C.$2,082$949
West Virginia$1,701$659
Wisconsin$1,540$503
Wyoming$1,437$370

Annual rates are for a 30-year-old male with good credit and a clean driving record. Your rates may vary.

Although minimum-coverage policies are much cheaper, full-coverage policies offer more protection. Minimum coverage, also known as liability-only coverage, only covers injuries and damage to others you cause in a car accident. Full coverage covers all injuries and damage, including to yourself and your vehicle.

Michigan and Florida are the most expensive states for car insurance. Drivers in states with a lot of accidents often pay higher car insurance rates. Drivers who live in populated areas or areas with a high crime rate also tend to pay higher rates.

Most expensive states for car insurance

StateFull-coverage average annual premiumCheapest full-coverage planCheapest full-coverage plan rates
Michigan$4,638USAA* and Progressive$1,872 / $3,040
Florida$2,990State Farm$1,956
Nevada$2,958State Farm$1,438
Louisiana$2,719USAA* and State Farm$1,723 / $2,628
Arizona$2,683State Farm$1,497

*USAA is only offered to military member and veterans as well as their families

If you live in a no-fault state and are injured in a car accident, you need to contact your insurance company no matter who caused the crash. Your personal injury protection (PIP) coverage will help cover your medical bills.

Car insurance rates can be higher in no-fault states. The following are no-fault states.

In an at-fault state, if you cause a car accident, you are responsible for covering injuries from the other vehicle.

A state’s minimum-coverage requirements for car insurance can also impact how much you pay compared to someone in a different state.

Minimum liability coverage requirements in each state

StateLiability requirements
Alabama$25,000 bodily injury per person; $50,000 bodily injury per accident; $25,000 per accident for property damage liability
Alaska$50,000 / $100,000 / $25,000
Arizona$25,000 / $50,000 / $15,000
Arkansas$25,000 / $50,000 / $25,000
California$15,000 / $30,000 / $5,000
Colorado$25,000 / $50,000 / $15,000
Connecticut$25,000 / $50,000 / $15,000
Delaware$25,000 / $50,000 / $10,000
Florida$10,000 per accident for property damage liability
Georgia$25,000 / $50,000 / $25,000
Hawaii$20,000 / $40,000 / $10,000
Idaho$25,000 / $50,000 / $15,000
Illinois$25,000 / $50,000 / $20,000
Indiana$25,000 / $50,000 / $25,000
Iowa$20,000 / $40,000 / $15,000
Kansas$25,000 / $50,000 / $25,000
Kentucky$25,000 / $50,000 / $25,000
Louisiana$15,000 / $30,000 / $25,000
Maine$50,000 / $100,000 / $25,000
Maryland$30,000 / $60,000 / $15,000
Massachusetts$20,000 / $40,000 / $5,000
Michigan$50,000 / $100,000 / $10,000
Minnesota$30,000 / $60,000 / $10,000
Mississippi$25,000 / $50,000 / $25,000
Missouri$25,000 / $50,000 / $25,000
Montana$25,000 / $50,000 / $20,000
Nebraska$25,000 / $50,000 / $25,000
Nevada$25,000 / $50,000 / $20,000
New Hampshire*$25,000 / $50,000 / $25,000
New Jersey$25,000/ $50,000 / $25,000
New Mexico$25,000 / $50,000 / $10,000
New York$25,000 / $50,000 / $10,000
North Carolina$30,000 / $60,000 / $25,000
North Dakota$25,000 / $50,000 / $25,000
Ohio$25,000 / $50,000 / $25,000
Oklahoma$25,000 / $50,000 / $25,000
Oregon$25,000 / $50,000 / $20,000
Pennsylvania$15,000 / $30,000 / $5,000
Rhode Island$25,000 / $50,000 / $25,000
South Carolina$25,000 / $50,000 / $25,000
South Dakota$25,000 / $50,000 / $25,000
Tennessee$25,000 / $50,000 / $15,000
Texas$30,000 / $60,000 / $25,000
Utah$25,000 / $65,000 / $15,000
Vermont$25,000 / $50,000 / $10,000
Virginia*$30,000 / $60,000 / $20,000
Washington$25,000 / $50,000 / $10,000
Washington, D.C.$25,000 / $50,000 / $10,000
West Virginia$25,000 / $50,000 / $25,000
Wisconsin$25,000 / $50,000 / $10,000
Wyoming$25,000 / $50,000 / $20,000

*Car insurance is not required in state

Some states require other types of car insurance coverage, too, such as uninsured motorist coverage, underinsured motorist coverage, medical payments coverage or personal injury protection.

What happens to my car insurance when I move states?

You need to get a new insurance policy when you move to another state. Contact your current insurance company to see if they offer policies in that state. If they don’t, you will need to switch companies.

Your car insurance rate may go up or down depending on where you move. Shop around and compare quotes from several companies before you buy a new policy.

Methodology

Car insurance rates were obtained from Quadrant Information Services for the largest insurance companies in every U.S. state and the District of Columbia. Unless otherwise mentioned, the following were used:

  • Minimum-liability rates include personal injury protection and/or uninsured motorist coverage where required by state law.
  • Prices reflect insurance for a 30-year-old male driver with good credit and a clean driving record.
  • Rates are provided for comparative purposes only. Your rates may vary.